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05
Jul

Public SchoolsMass cheating uncovered in Atlanta.

All efforts to raise black test scores, by throwing more money at the schools, have been a dismal failure. Take a look at the figure below. The Atlanta public schools are 83% black. The money spent per student is 45% above the state average. Massive amounts of white tax dollars from the rest of Georgia is being diverted to Atlanta so the blacks students can have the best of everything.

Despite this massive over-funding, the black-white achievement gap has remained the same. All claims that the Atlanta school system has improved has turned out to be a fraud.

This District State Average
Total per pupil expenditures $13,150 $9,089

 

Superintendent Beverly Hall allegedly retaliated against whistle-blowers. She could face ten years in prison.

Ethnicity: Atlanta Public Schools
Black, not Hispanic 83%
White, not Hispanic 10%
Hispanic 5%
Asian/Pacific Islander <1%
American Indian/Alaskan Native <1%

 

From New York Times…

A state investigation released Tuesday showed rampant, systematic cheating on test scores in this city’s long-troubled public schools, ending two years of increasing skepticism over remarkable improvements touted by school leaders.

The results of the investigation, made public by Gov. Nathan Deal, showed that the cheating occurred at 44 schools and involved at least 178 teachers and principals, almost half of whom have confessed, the governor said.

A culture of fear, intimidation and retaliation existed in the district, which led to a conspiracy of silence, he said in a prepared statement. “There will be consequences,” Mr. Deal said.

That will certainly include dismissals, according to school board members and the interim superintendent, Erroll B. Davis Jr., and could possibly result in criminal charges.

The findings of the investigation, which was conducted by a former state attorney general and a former county district attorney, will be delivered to district attorneys in three counties where cheating most likely took place.

Mayor Kasim Reed of Atlanta called the release of the investigation “a dark day for the Atlanta public school system.”