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27
Feb

Physical evidence of ancient Caucasians in North America continues to mount.

Many of the oldest physical human remains in North America are Caucasian and not Asiatic. While radiocarbon dating has flaws, it can be used to accurately determine relative age between sets of remains buried in similar conditions. Extensive radiocarbon testing on “Kennewick Man” demonstrates that it is the oldest skeleton ever found in the Pacific Northwest. Kennewick Man was most likely part of a small group of early Caucasians who crossed the Bering Straight. We know that significant numbers of early Caucasians passed through China and smaller groups even traveled to Japan and Indonesia.

Kennewick Man and his people were most likely overwhelmed by larger groups of Asiatic peoples and wiped out. Eventually, the Eastern Woodland Indians who are closely related to Mongolians, overtook the early “mound builders” wiping them out. In the Midwest United States there can be found the remains of three ethnically and culturally distinct Asiatic remains. Each group showing differences in height, skull structure, burial methods, etc. The largest group being the “mound builders.” All of them were eventually wiped out and replaced by the modern Eastern Woodland Indians. Many of the modern Indian tribes have legends about defeating these people in genocidal wars.

More recently archaeologists in Virginia have uncovered evidence that Caucasians also crossed the Atlantic many thousands of years ago. National Geographic has an excellent documentary on this called “Ice Age Columbus.”

Finally, groups like the Navajo and Alaskan Natives are closely related to the Chinese and Koreans. They were most likely among the last to cross the Bering Straight. In Hawaii and South America, the native peoples are Polynesian. Many of their legends involved crossing the Pacific in reed rafts. The famous Norwegian archaeologist Thor Heyerdahl demonstrated that this is possible in 1947 with his death defying “Kontiki Voyage.”

7. Racial Differences In Skull Shapes from Trevor T. on Vimeo.